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New Car Wash Build - First Time

MacGillivray

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Good afternoon/evening or what ever time of day it is where you are.

I am in the process of putting together plans to build a two unit in-bay automatic car wash in Manitoba Canada. I have done my research into who I would like to purchase our equipment from and have narrowed it down to Washworld or PDQ. These forums seem to have great feedback on the two manufacturers and we have local reps to service and provide the equipment. I am seeking feedback from this group on which equipment is superior to the other. I am not so much concerned about budget, as this is a long term investment and I am more than willing to spend the extra cash on good equipment. My big concern is that in Manitoba we get cold and long winters. Its nothing to see stretches of -30c. Please any feedback would be greatly appreciated, or if there is suggestions outside of those two I am willing to explore them as well.

For the building construction we will be using NuForm PVC building materials. This seems like the most logical options considering the water and moisture factor with car washes. Again, any feedback outside of this option is welcomed.

If there are any other suggestions, tips, or comments, please feel free to share. As this is my first build, I am more than willing to listen to people who have experience in this industry.

Thanks in advanced and look forward to the feedback.
 

MEP001

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Your decision could end up coming down to two factors: the materials the machine is constructed from, and the quality of the distributor. Washworld uses a lot of stainless steel that lasts forever (as long as no one runs into something), where PDQ used to use steel for the carriage frame (I don't know if they still do or not, but I assume they do). If you intend to do as much work on the units yourself as possible, Washworld might be the better way to go. PDQ uses as many proprietary parts as they can and will charge a premium for them, and they don't like to sell direct to the end user. I have no direct experience with Washworld, but I've heard they have very good end-user support. If your local PDQ distributor is like the one here, they have tiered service levels with the top level given the highest priority for repairs, including on weekends. C-stores love them. For the rest that like PDQ equipment, they're a necessary evil.
 

RSmith

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Your decision could end up coming down to two factors: the materials the machine is constructed from, and the quality of the distributor. Washworld uses a lot of stainless steel that lasts forever (as long as no one runs into something), where PDQ used to use steel for the carriage frame (I don't know if they still do or not, but I assume they do). If you intend to do as much work on the units yourself as possible, Washworld might be the better way to go. PDQ uses as many proprietary parts as they can and will charge a premium for them, and they don't like to sell direct to the end user. I have no direct experience with Washworld, but I've heard they have very good end-user support. If your local PDQ distributor is like the one here, they have tiered service levels with the top level given the highest priority for repairs, including on weekends. C-stores love them. For the rest that like PDQ equipment, they're a necessary evil.
If you don’t mind me asking, is the PDQ distributor you are referring to W.E.T. or Reeder? A wash we are in talks to buy has PDQ equipment, and we are going back and forth on replacing the equipment or keeping it.
 

Eric H

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I have WW in central Massachusetts. I typically see 1-2 weeks with below zero temps, occasionally dipping to -20 overnight. -30 is rare but does happen.
I have one site set to shutdown at zero degrees and another site shutdown at -10F. The biggest factor in staying open when it is cold is a good floor heat system. Buy your floor heat system from Huron Valley or Carwash Boilers Inc. They understand what your needs are. I made the mistake of buying my last floor heat package from the local plumbing supply house. The tubing runs are too long at that site, resulting in extended heat recovery times.
I agree with MEP regarding WW’s willingness to work with the end user vs PDQ. Both machines are top notch, you won’t be disappointed with either one. Choose the one with the best local distributor. Make your decision by speaking with other Carwash owners, don’t make your decision based on the sales pitch!
 

CheetahExpress

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Sent you a message so I wouldn‘t derail the original post more than I already had.
If you don’t mind me asking, is the PDQ distributor you are referring to W.E.T. or Reeder? A wash we are in talks to buy has PDQ equipment, and we are going back and forth on replacing the equipment or keeping it.
WET is the reason we dumped our Tandem and went with WW. Enough said.
 
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