What's new

How to secure lower door on vacuum?

Sequoia

AKA Duane H- 3 bay SS
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
440
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Someone has been opening the lower door on my JE Adams vacuums, searching for treasure among the dirt. The person was identified, and told to stop, but it continues. Apparently now multiple people are doing the same thing.

The lower access door is locked using two padlocks, but they are able to pry the door open, bypassing the hinge and lock entirely. Things don't always go back together correctly when they are done, and the operation of the vacuum gets compromised. Plus they are scuffing and damaging the equipment as they pry it open.

Is there a good locking/security solution for securing this? I've looked at traditional locking mechanisms, and nothing seems to fit.

I could leverage some contacts with local law enforcement if needed, but I prefer not to involve them unless it is something more serious.
 

MEP001

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
116
Points
63
Location
Texas
There is an expensive solution which requires some drilling:

I've been cutting some pieces of 1 1/2" stainless angle to do something like this:

20190225_222106.jpg

The main difference is that I'll use a disk lock that will hang at the bottom over the hasp.

I've had homeless people going through them two or three times a day, and if I don't clean the vacs out every day they spread the stuff everywhere, and of course they don't close and latch the door. Right now I'm just using zip ties to hold the door shut, otherwise they'll break the hasps to get in. Someone even broke the hasp on one instead of cutting the zip tie.
 

KleanRide

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2019
Messages
42
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Welcome to my cage fight.

Just finished locking all my vacs (lots of drilling) with the hasp pictured below and Abus disc locks. These hasps are heavier than the standard pressed metal straps and the hinged design allows you to bend them around the curve of the vac canister. So far so good (though none of my local hyenas seem to carry pry bars or tools). If they start that crap I'll just have them arrested. My plight with these bums has been well documented with the local cops and I've got signs and cameras everywhere.

Just waiting now to see who wants to go to jail first.
 

Attachments

soapy

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
2,094
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Rocky Mountains
I added these on all my vacs and so far so good. I never had this problem until about 3 months ago.IMG_2438.JPG
 

Sequoia

AKA Duane H- 3 bay SS
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
440
Reaction score
1
Points
18
Interesting methods of security, and I'm surprised how many others have folks "fishing" in the dirt.

What is the best way to drill through the stainless to install the added security items?
 

KleanRide

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2019
Messages
42
Reaction score
5
Points
8
Interesting methods of security, and I'm surprised how many others have folks "fishing" in the dirt.

What is the best way to drill through the stainless to install the added security items?
I used all purpose bits from Dewalt. Start slow to get a good divot going so the bit doesn't walk on you. Don't use too much speed to finish the hole or the bit will heat up and lose its bite.
 

Sequoia

AKA Duane H- 3 bay SS
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
440
Reaction score
1
Points
18
I saw a video where the gentleman used drill bit cutting paste and started with a small hole, then worked up in size. And yes, speed was an issue because I think the steel will harden further if it gets too hot?
 

MEP001

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
116
Points
63
Location
Texas
This vac is pre-drilled for the bracket I posted above, you would only have to drill out the rivets.

If you can get them, Milwaukee cobalt bits work really well in stainless. You should use cobalt regardless of the brand. I start with a 1/8" pilot hole and I don't use cutting oil, but it doesn't hurt. Drill at a slow speed with a lot of pressure, keeping a constant chip going. In thin stainless like a vac, you can go straight up to your final hole size. Don't use a center punch - you'll create a hardened spot right where you want to drill.
 

MEP001

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
116
Points
63
Location
Texas
If you want the hole in a particular place, it's much easier to start with a pilot hole. A larger bit will wander until it gets a good bite, and it will dull very quickly trying to start a hole in stainless. I can make hundreds of pilot holes with a single 1/8" cobalt bit - you won't get many holes if you start with a 3/8".
 

soapy

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
2,094
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Rocky Mountains
Industrial cobalt bits and cutting oil is what I use on stainless. I get mine at the local industrial supply, not Harbor freight.
 

MEP001

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
116
Points
63
Location
Texas
I tried the Harbor Freight titanium bits on stainless once. They wouldn't even mark the stainless. I should have known, the pack of 10 cost less than one good cobalt bit. They went straight in the trash.
 

soapy

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 1, 2007
Messages
2,094
Reaction score
64
Points
48
Location
Rocky Mountains
These are the cobalt bits I use. They will curl ribbons of stainless steel up when using them. NorsemanIMG_2463.JPG
 

MEP001

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 30, 2007
Messages
10,800
Reaction score
116
Points
63
Location
Texas
I picked up some Milwaukee cobalts from Home Depot, and they are crazy sharp. I can't even tilt the tray up without them cutting my fingers. I had some Triumph pro-grade bits that were only slightly used from drilling mild steel, and both my 1/2" ones went dull trying to drill through a 1/4" wall square tube. I went and got the Milwaukee set and they went through the tube like it was made of plastic.
 

Ghetto Wash

Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2007
Messages
567
Reaction score
2
Points
18
I've tried all the ways to secure the dirt door mentioned in this thread. This is the only one I have used that has worked. A scavenger hunter needs a wrench and a pry tool to get in. Typically they only have one or the other. This shroud goes completely around the bottom of the vac. The only way this one has been defeated is prying open the top door, cutting the filters with a pocket knife and reaching down through the cut filter into the dirt below.
 

Attachments

Randy

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 5, 2007
Messages
3,165
Reaction score
46
Points
48
The problem we've had with securing the lower vac door is they rip the door off the vacuum at the hinge. We gave up locking the doors and now clean them out every day at the car washes that have the biggest problem. We have a clean up guy who comes in the late afternoon and another who comes at mid morning.
 

soonermajic

Active member
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,427
Reaction score
18
Points
38
Location
texas
Same as Randy. Our meth heads had pry bars & tore through hinges to get inside for their .58{ !! So frustrating, but not anymore. They can have at it every single night, & they do, to collect pennies.
Weird what crack heads will do for some change.
 

Sequoia

AKA Duane H- 3 bay SS
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
440
Reaction score
1
Points
18
I installed the JE Adams 8104 vac security kit on the lower door of one vacuum. This raised the issue of whether the vandals will attack the upper door instead, thinking this would be another way to the "treasure." So I put an 8104 kit on that door as well. I will need to order two more kits to protect the 2nd vacuum.

Bummer to hear about the hinges being attacked. I will need to think about options to protect that as well.
 
Top